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The Insider

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Cast
Al Pacino, Russell Crowe, Christopher Plummer, Diane Venora, Philip Baker Hall, Lindsay Crouse, Debi Mazar, Stephen Tobolowsky, Colm Feore, Bruce McGill, Gina Gershon, Michael Gambon, Rip Torn
Released
1999
Jeffrey Wigand | nicotine | tobacco
Spoiler alert
Blog entry

(Watching the film, see if you can find even a single depiction of cigarette smoking.)

Producer Lowell Bergman leaves a message for Dr. Jeffrey Wigand: "I have scientific documents from a tobacco company..." (0:19)

Wigand tells Bergman, "I signed a confidentiality agreement. Doesn’t CBS have confidentiality agreements, Mr. Bergman?" (0:26)

Bergman: "Oh, Bill, Main Justice is investigating a major New York bank laundering narco dollars out of their Mexico City branch." (0:28)

B&W CEO Thomas Sandefur: "Now don’t be paranoid, Jeff." (0:31)

Bergman tells Wigand, "Well I don’t like paranoid accusations." (0:38)

Wigand tells Bergman, referring to the CEO of Johnson & Johnson, "When he found out that some lunatic had put poison in Tylenol bottles, he didn’t argue with the FDA."
Bergman, referring to tobacco company CEOs’ testimony before Congress: ”Swore under oath that they knew nothing about addiction...” (0:41)

Congressman "Do you believe nicotine is non-addictive?"
Tobacco CEO: ”Congressman, cigarettes and nicotine clearly do not meet the classic definitions of addiction. There is no intoxication.”
Congressman: ”I think each of you believe nicotine is not addictive and just would like to have this for the record.”
Tobacco company CEO: ”I believe that nicotine is not addictive.”
Another tobacco CEO: ”I, too, believe that nicotine....” (0:43)

60 Minutes host Mike Wallace answers Bergman, “Well, it isn’t cigarettes are bad for you.”
60 Minutes staffer: “What that is, is tobacco’s standard defense: ‘Addiction? We believe not. Disease? We don’t know/’." (0:44)

By telephone, Wigand tells Bergman, "I don’t wanna be paranoid."
”Are they doing it to make me feel paranoid?” (0:55)

Wigand tells Bergman, referring to Wigand’s wife Liane, "We were both stressed out..."
”Maybe for the audience it’s just voyeurism...” (0:58)

Bergman, referring to a cameraman: "This guy got a horse fetish?" (1:03)

Mike Wallce: "You heard Mr. Sandefur say, before Congress, that he believed nicotine was not addictive."
Wiigand: ”... common language within the company: ‘We are in the nicotine delivery business’.”
Wallace: “And that’s what cigarettes are for.”
Bergman: ”A delivery device for nicotine.”
Wallace: ”A delivery device for nicotine. Put it in your mouth, and light it up, and you’re going to get your fix.”
Wigand: ”You’re gonna get your fix.”
Wallace: ”You’re saying that Brown & Williamson manipulates and adjusts the nicotine fix, not by artificially adding nicotine, but by enhancing the effect of nicotine through the use of chemical elements such as ammonia.”
Wigand: ”While not spiking nicotine, they clearly manipulate it... It allows for the nicotine to be more rapidly absorbed in the lung and therefore affect the brain and central nervous system...”
Wallace: ”In other words, you were charging Sandefur and Brown & Williamson with ignoring health considerations consciously?” (1:12)

Wigand tells Bergman, "So I’m gonna fly to Pascagoula, give a deposition." (1:18)

Scruggs tells Wigand, "You’re assaulted psychologically." (1:25)

Attorney Motley tells Wigand, "This is a sworn deposition."
”In other words, it acts as a drug.”
”It acts as a drug...”
Motley tells another lawyer: ”So now, I’ll proceed with my deposition of my witness.”
”Dr. Wigand’s deposition will be part of this record...”
”Yes, it produces a physiological response which meets the definition of a drug. Nicotine is associated with impact, satisfaction. It has a pharmacological effect that crosses the blood-brain barrier intact.” (1:32)

Bergman tells the editor, "Run that Sandefur piece on ‘nicotine’s not addictive’."
Executive producer Don Hewitt: ”I heard Wigand’s deposition got sealed.”
Wallace, on television: ”... that they had long known that the nicotine in tobacco is an addictive drug, despite their public statements to the contrary...”
Sandefur, testifying: ”I believe that nicotine is not addictive.”
Wigand: ”We are in the nicotine delivery business... allows for the nicotine to be more rapidly absorbed in the lung and therefore affect the brain and central nervous system.”
”A delivery device for nicotine.”
Wallace: ”A delivery device for nicotine... you’re going to get your fix.”
Wigand: ”You’re gonna get your fix.” (1:35)

CBS lawyer Helen Caparelli: "If two people have... a confidentiality agreement and one of them breaks it..."
Wallace tells Bergman, ”Don’t worry.” (1:40)

Bergman, referring to Wigand: "He violates his own... confidentiality agreement..." (1:46)

By telephone, Wigand tells Bergman, "I was young, confused..." (1:54)

Wallace, on television: "... but we cannot broadcast what critical information about tobacco, addiction and public health he might be able to offer... because he had to sign a confidentiality agreement..." (2:04)

Bergman tells his wife, "Maybe I’m hooked. What am I hooked on?" (2:11)

Bergman tells Wallace and Hewitt, "... the entire deposition... you’re still standing here debating." (2:25)

Wallace, on television "CBS management wouldn’t let us broadcast our original story and our interview with Jeffrey Wigand because they were worried about the possibility of a multi-billion dollar lawsuit against us for tortious interference." (2:27)